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film, music, text, city, spectacle, pleasure

Coffee and Books in San Francisco’s Mission District – the perfect job?

BorderlandsBooks1

Borderlands Cafe, the (somewhat) newly minted accompaniment to San Francisco’s best science fiction and fantasy bookstore, Borderlands Books, is hiring:

We have an unusual job opening at Borderlands Cafe.  It’s not glamorous, but it would be great for a local high schooler or a nearby person with a flexible schedule.  The hours would be 7 pm – 9 pm, Monday – Friday, and the job would include cleaning, busing tables, and doing the closedown work at the Cafe.  Considering how short the hours are, the person really should live quite close to the cafe.  Pay is SF minimum wage, but you get to work with a great group of people and you get a discount at the bookstore!  Email jfeldman@borderlands-books.com for more information before sending a resume.

I’ve spent a lot of time there, and I can personally attest to the greatness of the people.  This job is a lot like the first job I had—at a game store—but with the addition of COFFEE!  So, totally awesome and vastly superior—possibly the perfect first job for a high schooler who lives in the area.

You can see that I am not alone in loving the cafe by checking out their Yelp page. (I love it just slightly less since they removed the couches up front, and have never been 100% reconciled to their no -WiFi policy, but I understand and support the reasoning behind both decisions.)

 

Filed under: Coffee, San Francisco, , ,

Furniture made from Golden Gate Bridge steel

If you are not a native San Franciscan, perhaps this won’t seem that special to you, but for me I find myself lusting after furniture in a way I haven’t done since I discovered the work of the Eames Brothers.

You remember that passage in Neal Stephenson’s Cryptonomicon when one of the characters is writing about Gomer Bolstrood furniture and his wife’s erotic fixation on heirloom furniture? Like that.

Golden Gate Bridge Furniture Co.

Filed under: Feel Good, San Francisco, , , ,

Dynamo Donut Envy

WE NEED A DOUGHNUT SHOP IN THE LOWER HAIGHT.
WHERE YOU GONNA GO, SAFEWAY? :-(

(via 911wasaninsidejob.org)

You’ll  just have to trek across town to the source of all-things round and cakey:

Filed under: San Francisco, , ,

San Francisco Street Food

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Filed under: San Francisco,

The Red Vic Movie House is Closing

Red Vic Movie House in San Francisco to close.
The already endangered repertory movie scene in San Francisco is taking yet another hit.

Later this month, 31 years to the day after it became an instant landmark in the Haight-Ashbury, the Red Vic Movie House will close. (via SFGate.com.)

On July 25, the Red Vic will show its last movie, bringing to an end a wonderful 30 year run as one of the funnest and funkiest rep movie houses in the land.

All of our friends love to watch movies. So in 1980, a group of us decided to collectively run our own cinema. Hence, the Red Vic Movie House. For almost 10 years, Red Vic’s first home was at the corner of Haight and Belvedere Streets. Here, we introduced our now legendary couches to offer our patrons a funky, yet comfy, place to watch their favorite films.
via RED VIC MOVIE HOUSE

It’s the end of an era in more ways than one. The Red Vic is one of the last independent neighborhood cinemas in San Francisco. And it is one of the last rep cinemas in the Bay Area – one of the last real movie theaters showing old movies. When it closes, in less than two weeks, there will only be a couple of places left to see classic films as they were meant to be seen – on the big(ish) screen, rather than on DVD and flat screen. And there will be one less place to see films other than big chain multiplexes in malls.

Among its many contributions to film culture in the Bay Area, the Red Vic gave us couches instead of individual seats, long before the lounge-style seating in deluxe theaters. In the original Red Vic, these were literally couches – mostly cast-offs and second hand items scrounged as cheap seating. And there was the popcorn – with real butter, of course, and nutritional yeast as an added topping. If you’ve never tried nutritional yeast on your popcorn, do it now – it’s brilliant.  With a glass of unfiltered apple cider, it made a really tasty and healthy movie treat.  They also had great coffee and brownies. All in all, the best snack food I’ve had at a movie theater.

And to remind you to bus your own damn dishes, they had one of the funniest cinema shorts since the UC’s “no smoking” message with John Waters, featuring one of the Red Vic staffers getting dragged under one of those couches by the Creature from the Black Lagoon.

The last three movies showing at the Red Vic are Orson Welles’ Touch of Evil, showing Sunday and Monday; one of the greatest rock concert films ever, The Last Waltz, on Tuesday and Wednesday; and lastly Harold and Maude, playing Friday through Monday.

Harold and Maude is an interesting choice for final film. It’s been a cult favorite at rep cinemas in the Bay Area for pretty much as long as I’ve been going to movies. I remember seeing it for the first time at Berkeley’s UC Theater in the late 70s and it was already a cult thing then, only a few year after its release. But I guess if I’d been scheduling things, I’d have been to tempted to go with another cult film, Marat/Sade. This used to sell out pretty regularly at Red Vic, and people would even come in costume – it was one of those “only in San Francisco” experiences. Well, actually everything about the Red Vic was a bit that way.

I’ll see you there tomorrow, and Tuesday and again for Harold and Maude. I’ll be the sad one with the big, big bowl of popcorn with nutritional yeast.

Filed under: Movies, San Francisco, , , , ,

Beautiful, affordable housing in SF’s Hunters Point

LEED Gold Community Springs up in Hunters Point: “David Baker’s colorful design ethics get scaled up to an affordable community development of 124 townhouses and 116 senior homes, aka the LEED Gold Armstrong Place and Armstrong Senior Housing in Hunters Point… (via Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World.)

Filed under: Architecture, San Francisco,

The Semiotic Richness of City Life

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One of the things I treasure about City life, especially here in the San Francisco Bay Area, is its semiotic richness – like wandering through an incredibly dense forest of signs and signifiers, and occasionally signs and wonders.

Part of what makes that density so appealing is the way it throws up all sorts of startling juxtapositions.

This morning on the BART train I stood next to two people, seated side by side but clearly not in any way connected to each other, both reading from their Amazon Kindle eBook devices.

The fellow on the outside was reading a book on the global financial crisis – discussing the stupidity and short-sightedness of the Wall Street firms and the whole subprime mortgage mess.  The woman next to him was reading a book on how to get rich in the real estate market…

Serendipity, ironic juxtapositions, semiotic surprise – public transit has so much more to offer than just reducing our climate footprint.

Filed under: San Francisco

Song of the Day: San Francisco

This following program is dedicated to the City and People of San Francisco, who may not know it, but they are beautiful – and so is their city…

Eric Burdon & The Animals, “San Franciscan Nights” – from Winds of Change (1967)

What else could I pick for “Song of the Day” on the day of my return to San Francisco, the cool gray city of love, baghdad by the bay? I may be coming back with my tail between my legs, bruised and broke, and it may be true that for me right now “there’s no place left to go,” but as Oscar Wilde put it, “It is an odd thing, but every one who disappears is said to be seen at San Francisco. It must be a delightful city, and possess all the attractions of the next world.” So I disappeared only to emerge, shaken and soul-lagged, somewhere a bit like heaven – home, San Francisco.

Filed under: Autobiography, San Francisco, Song of the Day,

From Hipster To Hippie, A Cautionary Tale

From Hipster To Hippie, A Cautionary Tale: “Hanah Snavely wrote about The Rise and Fall of Hippie Hill in San Francisco on The Bold Italic and included a wonderful graphic by Volume Inc. showing how a hipster might morph into a hippie.

(via Laughing Squid.)

Reminds me of a button I used to wear in high school: “Hippies with Haircuts.”

If you haven’t already, check out The Bold Italic from which this originated:

The Bold Italic is an experiment in local discovery.

Just when you thought you were a pretty savvy local, along came The Bold Italic. Our mission is to help people become better locals, equipping our members with rare local intel, backstory and potential adventures.

Our writers, the Bold Locals, find their way behind-the-scenes in San Francisco and come back with backstories of distinctive, offbeat local experiences.

(via About Us – The Bold Italic – San Francisco.)

Filed under: Humor, Interweb, San Francisco

The Plan to Map Every Tree in San Francisco

The Plan to Map Every Tree in San Francisco: Every tree in San Francisco will soon be accounted for online, thanks to a new, Wikified project that aims to plot them all.

The Urban Forest Map will officially launch Wednesday, drawing on tree information collected by the city of San Francisco and Friends of the Urban Forest, a non-profit group. Though the project is getting its start in the Bay Area, the site will head to other major cities in the coming months.

“We’re going to publish the most up-to-date data from our data sources. Then, from that point on, we’re going to allow the community to add and edit and update that information,” said Amber Bieg, the project manager of the Urban Forest Map project. “It’ll become a tree census from the community and function like a Wiki.”

(via Wired Science | Wired.com.)

I love this idea – the decentralized, anti-authoritarian aspect, the environmental focus, the whole thing. It is projects and ideas like this that make me so proud of San Francisco – we rock! – and hopeful for the social changes that computer technology might help bring about. It also suggested to me the possibility of taking more control over the urban forest, and perhaps switching some (more) of it to productive ends, to food and other resources we could all share.

Filed under: Interweb, San Francisco, ,

Tenderloin – Tourist Destination and Art Project

“Tenderloin Dynamic is a project developed by San Francisco-based Stamen Design. a series of interactive and printed pieces that allow visitors to explore the Tenderloin through a series of different maps and mappings. Using data from the Uptown Tenderloin Historic District, public data made available by the City of San Francisco’s datasf.org, and other data sets, the project will provide a unique view on this fascinating neighborhood.”

more, more, more – how do you like it, how do you like it – at GAFFTA – Tenderloin Dynamic.

Filed under: Art, San Francisco, Tech, ,

We love… community gardens.

The Hayes Valley Neighborhood PARKS Group (HVNPG) is an ethnically and economically diverse group committed to fostering neighborhood participation, pride, and environmental stewardship for the parks and recreation areas in the Hayes Valley-Western Addition of San Francisco. We accomplish our mission through programs and projects that empower all residents, youth, and their families to be healthy and safe, and to positively impact their community. Our programs engage, recreate, and educate children, families, and other residents.

(more info)

Filed under: San Francisco, ,

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zerode by nick chapman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

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The 400 Blows

zerode

is an over-caffeinated and under-employed grad school dropout, aspiring leftwing intellectual and cultural studies academic, cinéaste, and former poet. Raised in San Francisco on classic film, radical politics, burritos and soul music, then set loose upon the world. He spends his time in coffee shops with his laptop and headphones, caffeinating and trying to construct a post-whatever life.

 

What's in a name... The handle "zerode" is a contraction of Zéro de Conduite, the title of Jean Vigo's 1933 movie masterpiece about schoolboy rebellion.

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