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film, music, text, city, spectacle, pleasure

A new Christmas tune, from CeeLo Green and the Muppets

Generally, I’m very much a traditionalist when it comes to Christmas tunes: carols and Nat King Cole, that sort of thing.

But this hits my sweet spot.  What it has is sincerity.  CeeLo is not snarky.  He digs the Muppets, and he’s singing from the heart.  It may be somewhat slight musically, but it comes from the heart.

As they say, it’s the thought that counts. Mostly we don’t really “buy'” that—because we want someone to buy us that particular something tasty. But CeeLo and the Muppets remind us that all we need is love… Christmas can get pretty clichéd, but what sets the same old tunes, stories and so on apart is sincerity, heart.  And CeeLo’s got a big heart.

It’s the most wonderful time of the year.  If we put our thoughts and our heart into it.

(Jeez—am I sappy or what.)

Filed under: Music, , ,

Carolina Chocolate Drops – drop it like it’s sweet

This is what’s making me happy today…

Carolina Chocolate Drops, “Hit Em Up Style” – from the album Genuine Negro Jig

Ann Powers over on NPR’s All Songs Considered turned me on to this.  And turned on is right. Jazzed up. Knocked out.  Normally, in the past, this kind of roots music didn’t appeal to me, but I think Gillian Welch kind of opened my eyes/ears to being more receptive to what I had dismissed as “country” in the past.  This new alt bluegrass and roots music is amazing stuff.  New and old, deeply American, but in a way that is authenticate and interesting.  The racial dimension of Carolina Chocolate Drops is also compelling.  So much of what we take as American music comes out of this weird amalgam of Irish folk music and slave music that grew out African and Afro-Caribbean folk and native sounds.  As the LA Times described it, they “underline the connections between American bluegrass and folk with the genres’ little-known ancestry in Africa.”  And later that met up with Klezmer and Jewish music, when the other stuff hit New York and the songwriters and musicians working there, so many of whom were Jewish, starting working with it.

That’s the real American experience right there: Irish and British immigration, poor Irish getting off the boat and going straight into the maw of the American Civil War and ending up in Appalachia, slavery, Eastern European immigration in huge waves at the beginning of the 20th Century.  And it led to jazz, blues, r&b and rock. And then to alt bluegrass.

That’s what I like about America. That’s what people around the world like about America. Mitt Romney is the other America: lazy, stupid, arrogant, complacent, greedy, loud, utterly self-absorbed, contemptuous of other people and other cultures,  convinced that there is still a Manifest Destiny entitling people like himand his friends to get rich off the despoliation of the planet, and the exploitation and emiseration of others.

For more….

Filed under: Music, , , ,

Hardcore porn on Netflix, Amazon Prime – Caligula, Last Tango in Paris and 9 Songs [sfw]

Shared without comment for your… edification?

Hardcore porn on Netflix Streaming

Lets be honest. Youve never heard of most of the movies available to stream on-demand through Netflix. Many are ranked by users between the one and two star range. But, where these films lack in such things as say, plot, they often makeup for their cinematic shortcomings with explicit nudity. The below list of streaming Netflix films containing hardcore sex was compiled in part from titles cross listed on MrSkin.com under the category, “real explicit sex.” While I have seen many of these titles, for the others Ive had to take faith in the fact that Mr. Skin categorized these films alongside the hardcore sex tapes of Kim Kardashian, Kendra Wilkinson, Montana Fishburne, and Tila Tequila. (via Daily Loaf.)

Okay, I lied. Commenting now. The movies cited include 9 1/2 Weeks, 9 Songs, Caligula, Inside Deep Throat and Last Tango in Paris, at least some of which you’ve probably heard. And they are not just available through Netflix. You can also watch many of the films on demand through Amazon Prime.

Of those, 9 Songs (2004) is the most recent and possibly the most interesting, at least at this point.

Caligula (1979) was fun when it came out because it was sort of the Claytons of dirty movies: the porn you’re having when you’re not having porn. Lots of sex, but a gloss of culture (which was maybe just the gloss of money) that made it seem somehow less disreputable, lent to it in large part by a cast that included Helen Mirren, Peter O’Toole, and Malcolm McDowell. Plus history and costumes, which always lend a bit of gravitas. (Witness Downton Abbey.)

And both Last Tango in Paris and 9 1/2 Weeks were more or less sensations when they came out—because they were what Caligula only pretended to be: serious movies (or attempts) that nonetheless featured what was supposed to be serious sex.  But looking back at those two now that the sensation has faded, it’s clear they weren’t very good movies, and the sex wasn’t all that great either. I think they’re almost unwatchable, whereas Caligula at least has the virtue of being campy and silly, cheesy, and that has a certain pleasure to it, whereas the seriousness of the other two now just seems dreadfully pretentious.

9 Songs is also trying to be a serious movie with serious sex in it.  But—and this is a big difference—the sex is pretty good.

Though we might need to think about what constitutes “pretty good sex” in this context. Genuine hardcore porn is very focused stuff, in more ways than one. The camera angles, depth of field, lighting, even the cutting are all directed at maximizing scopophilia and sexual arousal. And you’re never in any doubt about what is going where at any given time (though in group scenes you may occasionally loose track of exactly whose whats are involved). And you’re never in doubt about when the action has reached its… climax. It is designed to have a direct appeal to our nether regions, and I find that directness appealing in its own way.

The sex in 9 Songs is not that. It is not hardcore sex, whatever the Daily Loaf might think. It’s sex. Sex as you (hopefully) know it, assuming you haven’t been utterly conditioned by porn. It’s a little vaguer. The people are focused, internally and on each other, but the scene, the details are more blurry. It’s not brightly light and in sharply focused close-up. And the camera spends much less time in what I think of as gynecological intensity mode. It is real sex, both in the sense that the actors are genuinely doing the things they seem to be doing on the screen, and in the sense that it is sex as people outside of movies (in Western society) often/generally experience and enact it. At least when they are that age.

Here’s what Roger Ebert had to say about the sex in his fairly positive and very smart review:

The sex scenes betray the phoniness of commercial pornography; when the Adult Film Awards give a prize for Best Acting, they’re ridiculed, but after seeing this film you’ll have to admit the hard-core performers are acting, all right; “9 Songs” observes the way real people play and touch and try things out, and make little comments and have surprised reactions.

What Mark Kermode found most interesting about the film was that director Michael Winterbottom had made “the least titillating, most explicit movie around.” He found the movie irritating, but still appreciated what Winterbottom was doing with the sex. But he hated the people.

As for it being a serious movie, a movie that is serious about being a movie and actually tries to think through what that means… Well, it was made by Michael Winterbottom who I find to be one of the more interesting directors currently making movies. His movies aren’t always good, but they are always interesting, even if on no other level than as attempts to interrogate productively what it means to be a popular film, and how popular films might be other than they are, or tend to be (i.e., everything from Transformers: The Dark of the Moon to The Master). His filmography includes Welcome to Sarajevo, Wonderland, 24 Hour Party People, and A Cock and Bull Story. He’s an intelligent and interested filmmaker, interested in what it means to make films, who thinks about what popular narrative cinema is and might be, and about how to push against the medium and its structures and expectations in (hopefully) productive and engaging ways.

9 Songs doesn’t always work. Both the narrative and the characters feel a bit too sketchy, and that’s pretty fatal. Kermode’s irritation with, even hatred of, the two main characters is not, sadly, a wildly idiosyncratic response. But I think it gets an A for effort, or at least a B, for giving us such good sex—that is, such real sex—in something approaching a mainstream English-language film, and doing that within a film that tries to play productively with both the visual and narrative qualities of mainstream film. (It also has a very good soundtrack.) It’s not an art film, and it’s not pornography. It’s something kind of new.  Possibly the beginning of something.

For more…

Filed under: Movies, , , ,

The Best Doctor Who Scene Ever (an update)

The Doctor Who clip I wrote about earlier was taken down, but here is an even longer, better quality version of the same scene from “The Unicorn and the Wasp” – quite possibly the best scene ever in the Doctor Who reboot (though I am sure some would pick a scene with the young Amelia Pond, such as ‘fish fingers and custard‘):

And you can watch the whole episode online through Amazon instant video.

For more…

Filed under: TV, ,

Clint Eastwood’s Comedic Timing

I’m not best pleased that one of America’s greatest filmmakers, Clint Eastwood, has chosen to throw in his lot very publically with America’s worst political party, and at what is possibly the lowest, most appalingly stupid time in its history.  In fact, Eastwood’s appearance at the RNC convention is likely to be the only highly-praised Eastwood performance I never see.

But I am kind of fascinated, from a geek/interwebz observer perspective, with the publicity/search engine optimization going on around it. Do a Google search on “clint eastwood comedic timing” and you get a full page of entries all with exactly the same heading:

Republicans Praise Clint Eastwood’s Speech: ‘His Comedic Timing 

I thought all the dot commies and Google code monkeys were on our side, but there are clearly some effective, interwebs-savvy publicists working for the RNC.

Anyway, there’s no way his performance at the RNC could match his gifted timing in such classics as Kelly’s Heroes or Paint Your Wagon

Filed under: Movies, , , , , , ,

Great Films—Seven Samurai, Notorious, The Ruling Class—on Hulu

Some of my favorite movies are available online, in high quality, for free (with limited ads) on Hulu right now.  I suspect these movies will only be temporarily available, as part of ongoing efforts to lure people in to Hulu Plus, so take advantage of them while they last:

The Seven Samurai (1954). What needs to be said of this movie? One of the greatest films ever made. Directed by Akira Kurosawa and starring a young Toshiro Mifune and the charming studio stalwart Takashi Shimura in one of his finest performances (his best being in Kurosawa’s Ikiru). Kurosawa drew on tropes and traditions of American Westerns as well as samurai movies, and in turn The Seven Samurai influenced both of those genres—albeit the samurai movie to a much greater degree—directly shaping such films as The Magnificent Seven (a remake of the Western-influence samurai movie as a Western) and more recently Takashi Miike’s 13 Assassins, which features a peasant warrior who is the direct descendent, if not an outright copy, of Mifune’s character in Seven Samurai.

The Tale of Zatoichi (1962) is not in the same class as Seven Samurai, but the long-running series of samurai movies is still a treat. Shintaro Katsu stars as Zatoichi, a blind masseuse roaming the Japanese countryside, who conceals a deadly sword in his cane and terrific swordsmanship beneath his bumbling façade.  Most of the films in the series seem to have much the same plot: Zatoichi comes to a new town where there is some strife, often involving gangsters and gamblers, and his attraction to a beautiful woman or sense of justice draws him into the conflict; when it’s over he’s slain all the bad guys, most of them in one climatic battle, but has to leave town, driven out, back to his wanderings, by a sense of his own flawed nature and of the violence he feels follows in his wake. Or something like that. You can figure it out for yourself if you have the time: Hulu is showing 18 of them for free at the moment.

I grew up watching these on weekends in a local Japanese theatre. They’re brilliant. After you watch them, you can read about the series on Wikipedia or check it out on Amazon. Takashi Kitano did a mostly excellent remake/updating of Zatoichi a few years back, with himself in the title role — but it was a bit to serious and realistic, and lacked the hokey charm I find in the originals.

Stagecoach (1939)—the film that transformed Westerns, bringing both John Ford and John Wayne to prominence.  The first appearance of John Wayne in the film is one of the great entrances of American cinema.

Notorious (1946)—one of Ingrid Bergman’s most powerful performances and Cary Grant as you have never seen him before. Bergman is a party-going playgirl in South America recruited to act as a spy; Cary Grant is her spy-master.

Charade (1963)—a movie I love, really so extravagantly that I might argue for it as one of the greatest movies of all time, though I know that in truth it isn’t. But Cary Grant has never been more charming, I think, which is saying a lot, and Audrey Hepburn is luminous and… funny. Really funny. I don’t think her gift of comic timing has ever been showcased as well (except perhaps in How to Steal a Million). Hepburn plays a young Parisian wife who suddenly finds herself a widow, and Cary Grant pops into her life as…well, watch it and see.  Directed by Stanley Donen, who started out as a song-and-dance man with Gene Kelly as his partner. He made his directorial debut working with Kelly on Singin’ in the Rain and On the Town (perhaps the greatest integrated musical ever), on which he is credited as co-director, and then went on to make a number of very good films on his own, including Indiscreet with Grant and Ingrid Bergman; but those first musicals aside, this is clearly his masterpiece.

The Blob (1958). A classic monster movie that still scares.  An unintentionally smart mash-up of teen movie and 50s sci fi monster flick, with one of Steve McQueen’s first performances, and a bizarrely fun and goofy theme song by Burt Bacharach.

The Ruling Class (1972). A tour de force performance by Peter O’Toole, one of his finest, as the mentally unbalanced heir of a British noble.  DO NOT read any details about this film before watching it (even my earlier post on it), as there’s a surprise twist about 2/3rds of the way through, and it is worth being surprised by it.  This is a cult classic, which used to get rapturous receptions at the UC Theatre in Berkeley during fairly frequent screenings in the late 1970s through mid 1980s. A bitterly black comedy whose social commentary may not seem particularly startling or original now, but was fairly sharp back in the day.  Worth watching for O’Toole’s performance alone.

Quadrophenia (1979)—a great soundtrack by The Who, mods versus rockers, and Sting.

Most of these are from the wonderful Criterion Collection, which guarantees that the prints and their digital transfer will be of the highest quality, and that the versions of the films will be the most original (no half-baked cuts for the American market or anything like that).

If you have a Roku or anything similar, you can even sign up for a free one-week trial, call in sick and stay home to watch all of them for free, over a few gloriously indulgent days of movie magic, on your (hopefully big screen) TV. Otherwise you can watch them on your computer; you know, now that I think of if, the office I’m working in right now has excellent broadband, and no network restrictions…

Filed under: Movies, , , ,

Being 007: Behind the Scenes at James Bond Auditions

A couple of the actors considered for the role would have been… unfortunate.

Filed under: Movies,

[Musique] John Zorn & Fred Frith – Late Works

A cool album from some under-appreciated major figures…

oFF tHE bEATEN tRACK(LIST)S

Artiste : John Zorn & Fred Frith
Titre de l’album : Late Works
Année de sortie : 2010
Label : Tzadik
Genre : Improvisation libre, free jazz

Malgré les informations contradictoires que l’on peut glaner sur le web, Late Works marque le premier témoignage studio des improvisations barrées de John Zorn et Fred Frith, musiciens que l’on peut sans flatterie considérer comme des légendes vivantes de la scène alternative new-yorkaise. Rompus à cet exercice, ces deux-là s’étaient retrouvés dès 1994 avec The Art of Memory, auquel suivra un second volume en 2006 ; à l’instar d’un autre duo mythique formé au sein de l’underground nippon des années 70 par Kaoru Abe et Masayuki Takayanagi, seuls existaient des enregistrements live de leurs collaborations explosives. Saxophone et guitare électrique semblent ainsi être faits l’un pour l’autre quand il s’agit d’improviser librement – et dans un grand fracas. Amis depuis…

View original post 203 more words

Filed under: Music

Some Great Rock (and other) Albums, dirt cheap and digital from Amazon.com

Not that I necessarily think we should all start paying for digital music, and certainly Amazon.com is way too big and powerful and gets too much of our money already, but they have some pretty good deals on MP3 albums going right now. I think this may be the other shoe dropping from Apple’s aggressive move into the eBook marketplace… and perhaps to Google and Apple’s cloud music storage systems.

Talking Heads – Speaking In Tongues – $2.99

Pink Floyd – The Dark Side Of The Moon (2011 – Remaster) – $2.99

Crosby, Still, Nash & Young – Deja Vu – $5

100 Must-Have Movie Classics – $2.99 (3 cents each)

The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars (40th Anniversary Edition) [Remastered] (Remastered) – $5

Cat Power – You Are Free – $2.99

David Bowie – Heroes – $2.99

Queen – Greatest Hits – $2.99

Grateful Dead – American Beauty (Expanded US Release) – $2.99

Mumford & Sons – Sigh No More – $2.99

Let It Roll – Songs Of George Harrison [+digital booklet] – $2.99

Filed under: Music,

Women of Star Trek

A trip down memory lane with the original Star Trek.  Dig those groovy interplanetary hairdos…

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For more…

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Game of Thrones and the severed head of George W. Bush

HBO Yanks Bush Head ‘Game of Thrones’ Episode, Halts DVD Shipments:

HBO is continuing to do damage control after producers confirmed that a model of President George W. Bush’s severed head appeared in the season one finale of Game of Thrones.

The premium cable network has pulled the 10th episode of the drama from rotation on digital platforms — including HBO Go and iTunes — and halted all future shipments of its best-selling Season 1 DVD set, The Hollywood Reporter has confirmed.

In addition, the dramatic end to the freshman season of the series adapted from George R.R. Martin’s books will be edited for all future airings both domestically and internationally, according to a new statement from HBO, which further reprimanded showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss. (via Hollywood Reporter

So do what I just did and order your copy now, while you still can enjoy this politically charged easter egg-ish bit of in-movie humor:

Game of Thrones: The Complete First Season – on Amazon.com

I have to confess – I haven’t watched any of the show yet.  I suppose I was put off by my increasing discomfort with the violence, particularly the sexual violence, in the books, of which I read the first three.  I also “cut the cord” with cable, and that has drastically changed my viewing habits – shifting me from the current trends back to my first and most fundamental love, old movies.  That, plus what I can get through the library, and as you might imagine, “Game of Thrones” has a long waiting list.

If you want to start with the books before watching the TV show, and from what I have heard that’s a pretty good idea, they are available through Powells.com:

Or of course through your local library (eg, the San Francisco Public Library, which has it in both electronic and old-fashioned paper copies).

 

 

You know… It’s possible that putting in the severed head of our last president was a clever plan to boost DVD sales and/or interest in the show, ready to be leaked when needed. In which case, I’ve just been the victim of viral marketing. Oh well.  I can always give it to some Republican friend for Christmas.

Filed under: TV, , , , ,

Bond… James Bond – and his cars

Bond In Motion exhibition at National Motor Museum on January 17, 2012 in Beaulieu, England. The display, which marks the 50th anniversary of the James Bond film series, is the largest exhibition of James Bond vehicles ever staged and runs until the end of the year. (Photos by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

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Filed under: Movies, , ,

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zerode by nick chapman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

Oh—and hello to Jason Isaacs.

Upcoming Bay Area Films of Interest

  • The Chase (Brando, Redford, Angie Dickinson) at BAMPFA September 29, 2017 at 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm BAMPFA
  • The General (Buster Keaton) at BAMPFA September 30, 2017 at 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm BAMPFA
  • Spring in a Small Town at BAMPFA September 30, 2017 at 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm a Small Town at BAMPFA
  • The Life of Wuxun at BAMPFA October 1, 2017 at 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm BAMPFA
  • The Third Man at BAMPFA October 6, 2017 at 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm BAMPFA
  • College (Buster Keaton) at BAMPFA October 7, 2017 at 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm BAMPFA
  • Went the Day Well? at BAMPFA October 7, 2017 at 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm BAMPFA
  • Bright Day at BAMPFA October 7, 2017 at 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm BAMPFA
  • Long Live the Missus at BAMPFA October 12, 2017 at 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm The UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, 2155 Center St, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
  • Quest for a Long-Lost Husband at BAMPFA October 13, 2017 at 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm BAMPFA
The 400 Blows

zerode

is an over-caffeinated and under-employed grad school dropout, aspiring leftwing intellectual and cultural studies academic, cinéaste, and former poet. Raised in San Francisco on classic film, radical politics, burritos and soul music, then set loose upon the world. He spends his time in coffee shops with his laptop and headphones, caffeinating and trying to construct a post-whatever life.

 

What's in a name... The handle "zerode" is a contraction of Zéro de Conduite, the title of Jean Vigo's 1933 movie masterpiece about schoolboy rebellion.

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